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You might be surprised with the latest findings which claim common painkillers of causing a heart attack. The findings suggest that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as Mortin, Advil, and Aleve increase the risk of a heart attack by 20 to 50 percent, compared with not using them, researchers found. This means the drugs causes 1% increased risk. Although the risk is small, from the viewpoint of public health, even small increases in risk of heart attack are important.
NSAIDs are widely used to treat pain and inflammation from long-term conditions, such as arthritis and other joint diseases. Many people also take them for short-term problems, such as menstrual cramps, fever from a cold or flu or an occasional backache or a headache, said lead researcher Michele Bally.
Bally suggests the reading of the label of NSAID medications and using the lowest possible effective dose. It is also advisable to consider alternative treatments.
Source WebMD

  1. December 3, 2017

    Yes, I too have read this study recently that common painkillers may raise risk of heart attack by 100%. The overall odds of having a heart attack were about 20% to 50% greater if using NSAIDs compared with not using the drugs, although it varied for the individual drugs assessed, which also included naproxen, diclofenac, celecoxib and rofecoxib. So, it is always better to take excess amount of pain killers only after consultation from your physician.

  2. December 6, 2017

    By expert opinion that the overall odds of having a heart attack were about 20% to 50% greater if using NSAIDs compared with not using the drugs, although it varied for the individual drugs assessed, which also included naproxen, diclofenac, celecoxib, and rofecoxib. That’s why we should take a drug if a doctor recommends it. It would be the best thing for us.

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