image courtesy womens heart-health

A heart attack does not always have obvious symptoms, such as pain in your chest, shortness of breath and cold sweats. In fact, a heart attack can actually happen without a person knowing it. It is called a silent heart attack or medically referred to as silent ischemia (lack of oxygen) to the heart muscle.

Symptoms of a silent heart attack
“Just like the name implies, a silent heart attack is a heart attack that has either no symptoms or minimal symptoms or unrecognized symptoms,” says Deborah Ekery, M.D., a clinical cardiologist at Heart Hospital of Austin and with Austin Heart in Austin, TX. “But it is like any other heart attack where blood flow to a section of the heart is temporarily blocked and can cause scarring and damage to the heart muscle.”

Ekery regularly sees patients who come in complaining of fatigue and problems related to heart disease, and discovers, through an MRI or EKG, that the person had actually suffered a heart attack weeks or months ago, without even realizing it.

“People who have these so-called silent heart attacks are more likely to have non-specific and subtle symptoms, such as indigestion or a case of the flu, or they may think that they strained a muscle in their chest or their upper back. It also may not be discomfort in the chest, it may be in the jaw or the upper back or arms,” she says. “Some folks have prolonged and excessive fatigue that is unexplained. Those are some of the less specific symptoms for a heart attack, but ones that people may ignore or attribute to something else.”

Image courtesy www.goredforwomen.org

  1. December 9, 2018

    A silent heart attack is a heart attack that happens without causing noticeable symptoms or at least, without causing symptoms so severe that the victim cannot ignore them. Most people who are having a heart attack know right away that something is very wrong. Additional symptoms are often present, which may include breaking out into a cold sweat, shortness of breath, or a feeling of impending doom.

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