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Cataract types include:

  • Cataracts affecting the center of the lens (nuclear cataracts): A nuclear cataract may at first cause more nearsightedness or even a temporary improvement in your reading vision. But with time, the lens gradually turns more densely yellow and further clouds your vision.
    As the cataract slowly progresses, the lens may even turn brown. Advanced yellowing or browning of the lens can lead to difficulty distinguishing between shades of color.
  • Cataracts that affect the edges of the lens (cortical cataracts): A cortical cataract begins as whitish, wedge-shaped opacities or streaks on the outer edge of the lens cortex. As it slowly progresses, the streaks extend to the center and interfere with light passing through the center of the lens.
  • Cataracts that affect the back of the lens (posterior subcapsular cataracts): A posterior subcapsular cataract starts as a small, opaque area that usually forms near the back of the lens, right in the path of light. A posterior subcapsular cataract often interferes with your reading vision, reduces your vision in bright light, and causes glare or halos around lights at night. These types of cataracts tend to progress faster than other types do.
  • Cataracts you’re born with (congenital cataracts): Some people are born with cataracts or develop them during childhood. These cataracts may be genetic or associated with an intrauterine infection or trauma.

These cataracts also may be due to certain conditions, such as myotonic dystrophy, galactosemia, neurofibromatosis type 2 or rubella. Congenital cataracts don’t always affect vision, but if they do they’re usually removed soon after detection.

Source: MayoClinic

  1. June 28, 2019

    Awesome post! Everything you need to know about cataracts, what they are, three common types of cataracts, causes, symptoms and treatments. Nuclear Sclerotic Cataracts. This is the most common type of age-related cataract, caused primarily by the hardening and yellowing of the lens over time. Cortical Cataracts. Posterior Subcapsular Cataracts. Thank you so much for sharing this helpful post.

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