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Headache is pain in any region of the head. Headaches may occur on one or both sides of the head, be isolated to a certain location, radiate across the head from one point, or have a viselike quality.

A headache may appear as a sharp pain, a throbbing sensation or a dull ache. Headaches can develop gradually or suddenly, and may last from less than an hour to several days.

A primary headache is caused by overactivity of or problems with pain-sensitive structures in your head. A primary headache isn’t a symptom of an underlying disease.

Chemical activity in your brain, the nerves or blood vessels surrounding your skull, or the muscles of your head and neck (or some combination of these factors) can play a role in primary headaches. Some people may also carry genes that make them more likely to develop such headaches.

The most common primary headaches are:

1. Cluster headache
2. Migraine
3. Migraine with aura
4. Tension headache
5. Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia (TAC), such as cluster headache and paroxysmal hemicrania

A few headache patterns also are generally considered types of primary headache, but are less common. These headaches have distinct features, such as an unusual duration or pain associated with a certain activity.

Although generally considered primary, each could be a symptom of an underlying disease. They include:

1. Chronic daily headaches (for example, chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, or hemicranias continua)
2. Cough headaches
3. Exercise headaches
4. Sex headaches

Source: Mayoclinic

  1. March 1, 2019

    My friend used to had a lot of headaches regularly and when she consulted a physician then he told her that the primary headaches are stand-alone illnesses caused directly by the overactivity of, or problems with, structures in the head that are pain-sensitive. This includes the blood vessels, muscles, and nerves of the head and neck. They may also result from changes in chemical activity in the brain.

  2. March 12, 2019

    Helpful stuff! Conditions that might cause nonprimary chronic daily headaches to include Inflammation or other problems with the blood vessels in and around the brain, including stroke. Infections, such as meningitis. Intracranial pressure that’s either too high or too low. Thank you so much and keep posting things like this.

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