g6pd

The condition called G6PD deficiency is a genetic disorder that mostly affects men. This is when the body does not produce sufficient glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase G6PD (enzyme).

The enzyme aids the red blood cells to function well. This also protects them from blood substances that can be potentially harmful to them.

Those with this deficiency’s red blood cells do not produce enough amount of G6PD or what they produce does not function as expected. When the G6PD is not enough, red blood cells can break. The process is called hemolysis. The person may have hemolytic anemia once the red blood cells are destroyed. Symptoms can involve dizziness, tiredness and other related symptoms.

Signs and symptoms of G6PD deficiency

Extreme dizziness or tiredness

paleness

Fast heartbeat

Jaundice

Fast breathing

Enlarged spleen

Tea, dark-colored urine

Causes

The deficiency is inherited. Those who are born with it was passed on from either or both of the parent through the genes. It can be passed on to the children and do not have symptoms at all.

Read more here

  1. March 1, 2019

    Yes this is true that G6PD deficiency is a genetic disorder and most often affects males. It happens when the body doesn’t have enough of an enzyme called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). This enzyme helps red blood cells work. It also protects them from substances in the blood that could harm them. In people with G6PD deficiency, either the red blood cells do not make enough G6PD or what they do make doesn’t work as it should. Without enough G6PD to protect them, the red blood cells break apart.

  2. March 11, 2019

    Great reading so far! In people with G6PD deficiency, either the red blood cells do not make enough G6PD or what they do make doesn’t work as it should. Triggers of hemolysis in kids with G6PD deficiency include illness, such as bacterial and viral infections. some painkillers and fever-lowering drugs. Thanks and keep up the good job!

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